Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor – The Bright Lord DLC launches this week

Check out the trailer for the major new expansion, out Wednesday

In Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor, players saw Celebrimbor’s memories of being dragged back to Mordor, forging the Rings of Power, stealing the One Ring itself, and raising an army to battle his greatest Nemesis, the Dark Lord Sauron.

Now players will have the chance to play these epic events, wield this power for themselves and learn the fate of Celebrimbor, the greatest Elven king of the Second Age and the Bright Lord of Mordor — thousands of years before he became the Wraith that denied Talion death.

When introducing The Bright Lord for Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor, the opportunity to tell such a significant story from the history of Middle-earth isn’t the sort of challenge we take lightly. With The Bright Lord, we didn’t hold back. Prepare for a new playable character in Celebrimbor (along with a Celebrimbor skin for all of your adventures), a new story campaign and missions culminating in an epic battle against the ultimate Nemesis, the Test of the Ring Challenge Mode, new powers for you to try out as you wield the One Ring, and Celebrimbor’s deadly bow skills.

We’d love to tell you more, but frankly, we just can’t bring ourselves to ruin the surprise. There’s a lot of amazing stuff in The Bright Lord that we’re very proud of, and we can’t wait for you to wield the power of The One for yourselves.

See you in Mordor!

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This looks incredible!

This game is like a cover band doing a cover of a cover song

This is probably one of the best games of 2014.

Looking forward to this DLC. Lord of the Hunt was not impressive but I have a feeling that this one will be much better.

4

So, is this going to be another mini-campaign completely set apart from the main game, or did you learn something from Lord of the Hunt and integrated it into appropriate positions in the Talion’s story? Or did you go all out and gave the option to directly play it through the start menu, but still integrated it logically (i.e. at Celebrimbor’s Flashbacks) into the main campaign?
I was extremely disappointed with Lord of the Hunt being set apart from the main game, a stand-alone add-on you still need the game for. It’s not what I call an expansion. I am still hoping you will release a patch to integrate LotH into the main story campaign and let new powers and enemies and beasts be present in Talion’s main story, but judging from the universal lack of responses community feedback has received on any venue (you don’respond in the forums, the wiki, or twitter in any way), I will have to resign myself to getting mini-games instead of real expansions that would add to the replay value of...

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So, is this going to be another mini-campaign completely set apart from the main game, or did you learn something from Lord of the Hunt and integrated it into appropriate positions in the Talion’s story? Or did you go all out and gave the option to directly play it through the start menu, but still integrated it logically (i.e. at Celebrimbor’s Flashbacks) into the main campaign?
I was extremely disappointed with Lord of the Hunt being set apart from the main game, a stand-alone add-on you still need the game for. It’s not what I call an expansion. I am still hoping you will release a patch to integrate LotH into the main story campaign and let new powers and enemies and beasts be present in Talion’s main story, but judging from the universal lack of responses community feedback has received on any venue (you don’respond in the forums, the wiki, or twitter in any way), I will have to resign myself to getting mini-games instead of real expansions that would add to the replay value of the main game and bring some variation.

Welcome to the concept of DLC. Most DLCs will require the main game to work. Standalone DLCs are rare. As much as I find the Lord of the Hunt DLC to be mediocre, I still enjoyed it. Clearly it is from the older days of the main character and not related to the main game a lot. New beasts can not be integrated to the main story because these new beats arrive to Middle Earth after the main story.

4.2

@iARDAS Because it would’ve been impossible to say, once you’re at a certain point in the Dwarf’s hunting quest: “Talion! Did you see? They brought new prey from the South! A whole bunch of uglies came for reinforcements and they brought along beasts! Graugs and Caragors I’ve never seen! Let us hunt, Talion, let us hunt!”

The disappointment does not come from the content itself, it’s that the DLC does not enhance, enrich or enlarge the main game, which is something that you would expect from an open-world sandbox game “expansion”. Not a glorified epilogue whose only connection to the maingame is the “Barbados-Talion” skin.
If they had wanted, they could’ve easily found a way to integrate it into the main story – for people starting a new game or being in one. It would’ve brought new powers, new game mechanics and variety to the maingame, could’ve even increased the difficulty to make things a bit more challenging. But yes, that would’ve been more work.
The stand-alone epilogue is fi...

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@iARDAS Because it would’ve been impossible to say, once you’re at a certain point in the Dwarf’s hunting quest: “Talion! Did you see? They brought new prey from the South! A whole bunch of uglies came for reinforcements and they brought along beasts! Graugs and Caragors I’ve never seen! Let us hunt, Talion, let us hunt!”

The disappointment does not come from the content itself, it’s that the DLC does not enhance, enrich or enlarge the main game, which is something that you would expect from an open-world sandbox game “expansion”. Not a glorified epilogue whose only connection to the maingame is the “Barbados-Talion” skin.
If they had wanted, they could’ve easily found a way to integrate it into the main story – for people starting a new game or being in one. It would’ve brought new powers, new game mechanics and variety to the maingame, could’ve even increased the difficulty to make things a bit more challenging. But yes, that would’ve been more work.
The stand-alone epilogue is fine for people who had already finished the game, but it doesn’t add replay value. And that’s a shame.

5

And speaking of resignation, are we ever going to get a usable Remote Play Controls Layout for the Vita? Because the one you have (the default button mapping putting the triggers on the back touchpad) really is NO control layout at all and makes Remote Play pretty much impossible.

6

Summing up my fears and concerns in one neat sentence from the Kotaku Review of the Bright Lord:

“Like The Lord of the Hunt, Bright Lord’s best ideas end up going to waste simply because they’re closed off behind an arbitrary virtual barrier of a self-contained campaign that’s nowhere near as good as the base game. ”

Summing up my (dashed) hopes in another neat sentence from the Kotaku Review of the Bright Lord:

” I hope that whatever Monolith does next with Mordor pays closer attention to what made their original work such a joy to play.”

Now, I haven’t played it, yet. Truth be told, I didn’t play much of Lord of the Hunt, either, since it was so incredibly frustrating that it was a stand-alone feature and NOT integrated into the main campaign.
I greatly enjoyed Shadow of Mordor, so much so, that after pre-ordering the game, I bought the season pass two hours after starting to play the game – pretty much the biggest compliment I can give a game these days.

Yet, so far, the Season ...

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Summing up my fears and concerns in one neat sentence from the Kotaku Review of the Bright Lord:

“Like The Lord of the Hunt, Bright Lord’s best ideas end up going to waste simply because they’re closed off behind an arbitrary virtual barrier of a self-contained campaign that’s nowhere near as good as the base game. ”

Summing up my (dashed) hopes in another neat sentence from the Kotaku Review of the Bright Lord:

” I hope that whatever Monolith does next with Mordor pays closer attention to what made their original work such a joy to play.”

Now, I haven’t played it, yet. Truth be told, I didn’t play much of Lord of the Hunt, either, since it was so incredibly frustrating that it was a stand-alone feature and NOT integrated into the main campaign.
I greatly enjoyed Shadow of Mordor, so much so, that after pre-ordering the game, I bought the season pass two hours after starting to play the game – pretty much the biggest compliment I can give a game these days.

Yet, so far, the Season Pass content was one tremendous disappointment. Lord of the Hunt was like a malicious demo, teasing me with thoughts like “Man, this would’ve been so awesome to do in the main game”. If the Bright Lord DLC, as seems to be the case, is a similar letdown… well, it seems very hard to understand for me, how a company can manage to take away the single most important part of open-world, sandbox games: The openness of the world and the opportunities to experiment with it.
I was hoping the “expansions” (which they are not, they are just unrelated, separate add-ons, really) would bring me new tools for my experimentation tool box, new challenges and new ways to deal with them. Seems like that is not the way it will be.

I am not saying that this is not worth your money, or that you shouldn’t enjoy it. If you do, I am very happy for you. It just seems to me not worth MY money, since the aspects I enjoyed most about the main game appear to be, once more, absent in this newest and presumably last DLC.

This should have been the first DLC, this looks great!

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